VIC FIRTH ARTIST
IAN ROSENBAUM

Still only 24 years of age, American percussionist Ian Rosenbaum has developed a musical breadth far beyond his years. As a member of the Verbier Festival Orchestra Ian performed with many of the worlds most noted conductors, including Charles Dutoit, Valery Gergiev and Zubin Mehta. Tours with this extraordinary orchestra comprised of musicians from around the world took him to the major concert halls of France, Germany, Switzerland and the United States.

The following season, he successfully entered the realm of solo marimba performance making his Kennedy Center debut in Washington D.C. and later that year garnered a special prize created for him at the Salzburg International Marimba Competition.

However, it is in the sphere of chamber music performance that Mr. Rosenbaum has achieved his greatest success. He frequently performs with the acclaimed So Percussion group and has appeared at the Norfolk, Yellow Barn and Chamber Music Northwest Festivals. At the conclusion of Yellow Barn, artistic director Seth Knopp said of Ian, “Ian Rosenbaum’s music-making is informed by a wonderful intelligence, interpretive insight and prodigious control.  But above all, it is his openness of approach that makes him an unusually sensitive artist and collaborator.”

Ian is a member of Le Train Bleu, Novus NY and the Wanmu percussion trio. He recently joined the faculties of the Peabody Institute’s preparatory program and Yale College where he founded an undergraduate percussion ensemble. Ian is a member of Chamber Music Society Two.

PERFORMANCE SPOTLIGHT:
"LIgNEouS 1 for Marimba and String Quartet (2010) " by Andy Akiho

About the piece:

LIgNEouS – adjective: made, consisting of, or resembling wood ; woody. (Oxford Dictionary)
LIgNEouS was inspired by my amazingly talented friends of the Yale Percussion Group. It was commissioned by John and Astrid Baumgardner for the 2010 Norfolk Chamber Music Festival.
     – Andy Akiho

LIgNEouS is available for purchase through PAYPAL.

For more information on Andy Akiho's compositions, please visit AndyAkiho.com



"Tension Study No. 1" by Samuel Carl Adams
     John Corkill, Ian Rosenbaum (percussion) and Max Zuckerman (guitar)

About the piece:

This is the first of two studies that deal with physical and instrumental tension as well as the tension inherent in tonality. Perhaps the most transparent ‘tension’ in the first study is the guitarist’s revealing of the bass line by the gradual detuning of the instrument and the subtle pitch bend created by the percussionist’s use of pressure on the vibraphone. Emotionally and instrumentally, I hear this music as part of a tradition of the melancholy in guitar music – we hear it from John Dowland to Muddy Waters.

I would like to thank the following:
Andrew Meyerson and Travis Andrews for commissioning this piece, Adrian Freed @ CNMAT in Berkeley for the resonant filters, Max Zuckerman, John Corkill, and Ian Rosenbaum for providing energy, emotion, and enthusiasm to the first couple of performances.

I wrote the guitar processing exclusively in Max/MSP. I created samples exclusively with a Kolkata pump Harmonium.

This first study is dedicated to Paul Dresher.
  – Samuel Adams, November 2010

For information about purchasing this piece, please visit:

http://www.samuelcarladams.com



"Reflections on the Nature of Water"
   by Jacob Druckman

Movements 1 – 3: Movements 4 – 6:

 

Ian's Vic Firth implements of choice for this selection:

Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Medium soft. A general mallet that covers the lower four octaves of the marimba.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]
Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Medium. The most popular model in the series‚ this mallet covers the entire range of the marimba and produces a singing sound that is full of life.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]
Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Medium hard. Bright‚ but not to the point of "xylophone-like" brilliance.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]


About the piece:

Jacob Druckman's Reflections On The Nature Of Water (1986) for solo marimba was commissioned by William Moersch under a Consortium Commissioning Grant made through the National Endowent for the Arts. Druckman used Reflections on the Nature of Water as an homage to Claude Debussy, whose Preludes had inspired the young composer. It was Monet's painting "Reflections on Water" that inspired Debussy's "Reflections In the Water," from Images, Book One (1905).

Druckman likewise paints the musical text for the listener by titling each of the work's six pieces. "Crystalline," with its thematic material, paints a picture of a change in the water's consistency. "Fleet," with a quick pace, ebbs and flows. Sharp interruptions punctuate and disrupt the flow of the piece with a calculated persistence. The third piece, "Tranquil," exists as a pulsating, almost hypnotic and meditative entity of its own. Without haste, this music has a sustained and forward-moving quality. "Gently Swelling" offers a different style: its spirited dancing, while graced with splashes of new color and timbre, remains constant in its motion. "Profound" seems to return the piece to a level of stately depth and consciousness. With a patient confidence, this music suggests a definite complexity within a mask of simplicity. Finally, "Relentless" is somewhat reminiscent of the music in "Gently Swelling." In this piece, Druckman concludes his own exploration of a new, romanticized Impressionism.



Khan Variations (2001)
     by Alejandro Viñao


Ian's Vic Firth implements of choice for this selection:

M112 (low) - M114 - M114 - M115 (high)

Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Soft. Produces a broad sound with tremendous projections that is dark‚ but not muffled.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]
Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Medium. The most popular model in the series‚ this mallet covers the entire range of the marimba and produces a singing sound that is full of life.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]
Robert Van Sice Signature Keyboard
Medium hard. Bright‚ but not to the point of "xylophone-like" brilliance.
L = 17"
  [enlarge photo]


About the piece:

"For some years I have listened to the Pakistani singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. He was perhaps the greatest exponent of Qawwali, the music of the sufi mystics. This music in general, and Ali Khan’s singing in particular, are characterized by remarkable rhythmic and melismatic subtlety.

The Kahn Variations are a set of 8 rhythmic variations based on a traditional theme from Qawwali music as sang by Ali Kahn. The basic pulse and ‘feel’ of the music has lingered in my mind ever since I first heard the recording in the early 90’s. I developed each of the 8 variations -which are played as a continuous piece- exploring a different rhythmic and melodic aspect of the original theme. However, from the harmonic point of view the piece is rather static, respecting the lack or harmony -in the western sense- of the original traditional theme.

As I look at the score now, I can recognize a range of influences from Conlon Nancarrow, tango music, and my own previous pieces for marimba. All these influences have one thing in common: the articulation of pulse, or multiple simultaneous pulses to create a dramatic musical discourse."

Khan Variations was jointly commissioned by Bogdan Bacanu, Michael Burritt, Ricardo Gallardo, Eduardo Leandro, Nanae Mimura, William Moersch, Peter Prommel, Gordon Stout, Jack Van Geem, Robert Van Sice, Nancy Zeltsman and Alan Zimmerman, with the assistance of New Music Marimba. Nancy Zeltsman was the "Project Organizer"

A.V.

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE A COPY OF "KHAN VARIATIONS"



Dressur (1977)
     by Mauricio Kagel


About the piece:

German-Argentine composer Mauricio Kagel is one of the most intriguing composers of the 20th century. Many of his diverse works contain undercurrents of surrealism and anarchism in an effort to shed light on—and often confront—the musical tradition. His film Ludwig Van refashions Beethoven scores as furniture; his chamber work Der Schall employs cash registers and household appliances as its main instruments; and in his opera Staatstheater, members of the chorus perform overlapping solos, soloists sing in a chorus, and non-dancers present a ballet.

The half-hour percussion trio Dressur (1977) is rooted in Kagel's concern for how audio recordings have altered the tradition of audience experience. "In the 19th century people still enjoyed music with their eyes as well, with all their senses," Kagel has expressed. "Only with the increasing dominance of the mechanical reproduction of music, through broadcast and records, was this reduced to the purely acoustical dimension. What I want is to bring the audience back to an enjoyment of music with all senses. That's why my music is a direct, exaggerated protest against the mechanical reproduction of music."

Like many of the other works in Kagel's "instrumental theater" idiom, Dressur therefore combines the visual element with the auditory, the theatrical with the musical. Using over 50 instruments and non-instruments, Kagel creates sound out of theater (such as when a percussionist slams a chair on the ground several times), and theater out of sound (such as when castanets mimic the sound of a typewriter). The percussionist is a particularly fitting conduit for the visual-aural convergence: even in the most traditional works, his or her striking a variety of instruments, often while clearly visible behind several seated performers, seems to possess an inherent theatricality.

Interestingly, Dressur has become some - what of a YouTube hit lately, with a handful of videotaped performances (many by Yale's own performers) totaling several thousand hits. If technological advances in the 20th century resulted in audiences listening without seeing, those in the 21st may help bring us "back to an enjoyment of music with all senses." —Jacob Cooper

 


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